decorative illustration showing gears with digital icons in them and a row of five people underneath

Summer Digital Teaching & Learning Series

The 2022 Summer Digital Teaching and Learning Series will run from August 24-26, 2022. Sessions will take place online, via Zoom.

This year’s series is organized around the theme Engaging and Inclusive Digital Learning, and will feature 3 tracks:

illustration of blue figures sprouting from leaves and the title Games + Learningillustration of a woman with brown skin and red shirt and brown pants typing on a laptop and the title Digital Storytellingillustration of a circle of hands in bright colors with the title Inclusive Design + Design Justice

Each track will have 3 sessions; see below for individual session details. Participants who attend all 3 sessions in a track will receive a certificate of completion.

The strategies and approaches introduced in these sessions can be implemented in multiple modalities, including in primarily on-ground courses, hybrid courses, and fully online courses. So no matter in what modality you are teaching this fall, you’ll find ideas to support student learning in your course.

HOW DO I REGISTER?

There is one registration form that covers all the tracks and individual sessions. You can register for as many or as few individual sessions as you would like, within a track, or across tracks. Participants who attend all of the sessions in a particular track will receive a certificate of completion for that track.

Check out individual session details, which include times and dates, by clicking to expand the track titles below. Click the “Register Now” button below to open the registration form (form will open in a new tab).

Register Now

From systems and strategies to personae and perspectives, games can be used to explore critical topics while engaging and connecting our students.  In this series we’ll look at a range of approaches to games and learning, from real world, case study based simulations to open ended collaborative storytelling.  We’ll also cover the basics of game design, and think about game making as a powerful learning activity – no prior experience with games or game making required.

2022-07-01T16:53:06-04:00

Serious Games: Simulations and Tabletop Exercises

Wednesday, August 24, 2022
12:30-1:30 pm Pacific / 3:30-4:30 pm Eastern

Online via Zoom

Fires, floods, and natural disasters.  Cross-cultural interactions, multi-party treaties, and fraught negotiations.  Global thermonuclear war.  (How about a nice game of chess?)  The power of games to mimic and model real world scenarios is widely used to teach, learn, and explore human behaviors in complex situations.  In this panel presentation, experts from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies will showcase examples of simulations and tabletop exercises that they’ve used in courses and professional settings, and discuss the key considerations in planning, developing, and running these kinds of immersive activities.

2022-08-08T17:20:24-04:00

Games & Narrative: Character, Storytelling, & Worldbuilding

Thursday, August 25, 2022
12:30-2:00 pm Pacific / 3:30-5:00 pm Eastern

Online via Zoom

Games can be a powerfully social medium, connecting players as they take on characters, understand new perspectives, and collaborate to build the world of the game.  We’ll discuss how narrative serves as a powerful organizer and motivator across settings, some of the range and variety of character based and role playing games, and the kinds of teaching and learning they enable.  Then we’ll do a playthrough of the rules-light, fast-paced storytelling game Kids on Bikes, with time after for a debrief and discussion.  No prior experience required, come ready to play and explore.

 

2022-08-08T17:21:03-04:00

Game Design Workshop and Game Making for Deep Learning

Friday, August 26, 2022
12:30-2:00 pm Pacific / 3:30-5:00 pm Eastern

Online via Zoom

Designing, making, testing, and teaching games engages a range of high level cognitive skills, running the gamut of Bloom’s taxonomy and beyond.  Facts, concepts, and relations have to be rethought and reorganized, and new connections and understandings made.  Making games is a powerful way to explore how seemingly disparate elements can interact, and generate complexity and surprise.  Creating physical games out of basic elements like paper and pen can also be a welcome respite from screen fatigue, and engage spatial and mechanical reasoning that are difficult to reach digitally.

In this workshop, we will discuss a broad overview of kinds of games, and the basic interactions that make them up – the mechanics.  Then we will run through an entire cycle of the game making process, brainstorming, creating paper prototypes, play testing, and teaching.  No previous experience with game design is needed, nor are any special materials.  Please do have at least some paper and pens handy, and markers, scissors, coins, and the like may also be useful.

Storytelling facilitates connections between people and ideas, and links the past, present, and future. Storytelling also can advance understanding of complex ideas, and promote inclusion and diversity in the classroom.

While digital storytelling has its roots in video production, today it makes use of a wide range of technologies. It can be a compelling and powerful learning approach for any academic discipline or topic.

In this series of workshops, you’ll be provided with an introduction to digital storytelling and ways to structure a digital storytelling class activity, you’ll practice designing a storyboard and building out a short digital story, you’ll learn about assessing and sharing digital stories, and you’ll design your own rubric for assessing your students’ work.

2022-07-01T16:19:34-04:00

Introduction to Digital Storytelling and Structuring Digital Storytelling Activities

Wednesday, August 24, 2022
9:00-10:00 am Pacific / noon-1:00 pm Eastern

Online via Zoom

This workshop will provide an introduction to digital storytelling, including discussing some of the skills that students can develop and practice through digital storytelling activities, and some of the tools that might be used to build digital stories. Then we’ll talk through different pedagogical approaches to incorporating digital storytelling in the classroom, and how you might structure a digital storytelling class activity. As part of this workshop, participants will use Google Jamboard to practice drafting out a storyboard.

2022-07-01T16:19:18-04:00

Building a Digital Story Using StoryMaps or Pressbooks

Thursday, August 25, 2022
9:00-10:00 am Pacific / noon-1:00 pm Eastern

Online via Zoom

In this second workshop in the Digital Storytelling series, we’ll dive into two tools that can be used to create and share digital stories: StoryMaps and Pressbooks. We’ll provide an introduction to these tools, and then participants will practice building a short digital story using their tool of choice, along with either the storyboard they created in the first workshop, a storyboard provided by the facilitators, or another storyboard of their choosing. You do not need to attend the first workshop in order to participate in this second one, but you are encouraged to attend both, if possible.

2022-07-01T16:19:05-04:00

Assessing & Sharing Digital Stories

Friday, August 26, 2022
9:00-10:00 am Pacific / noon-1:00 pm Eastern

Online via Zoom

Assessing digital stories, and digital projects in general, can sometimes be challenging given the various forms projects can take and the difficulty of determining key learning outcomes for an activity (e.g., narrative building, communication, education, technical skills, etc.). In this final session in the Digital Storytelling series, we’ll discuss some best practices for assessing digital storytelling assignments, including: formative versus summative feedback, process versus product, and the benefits of using a rubric. Session participants will engage in a hands-on activity designing a rubric for their own purposes, based on some templates that we’ll share.

We’ll also discuss what happens once assignments have been assessed. Would you like to archive student projects? Share them publicly? Use them in future classes? We’ll conclude the series by sharing things to consider when choosing a digital platform and best practices for maintaining digital stories once they’ve been created. You do not need to attend either of the other workshops in this series in order to participate in this final one, but you are encouraged to attend all, if possible.

It is more apparent than ever that our students have a variety of learning needs and preferences, and that students continue to encounter a variety of challenges that are barriers to successful learning. Inclusive design and design justice approaches can be used to design courses that engage students where they are, and to identify and work toward addressing barriers to learning. In these sessions, you’ll learn about, and practice, strategies for noticing exclusions and potential barriers in your course design; work with students to design more inclusive courses; and learn how the Middlebury Online Course Design rubric can help you to design more inclusive online courses.

2022-07-01T16:54:48-04:00

Noticing Exclusions in Your Course Design

Wednesday, August 24, 2022
11:00 am-noon Pacific / 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern

Online via Zoom

In her book Mismatch, Kat Holmes notes, “Designing for inclusion starts with recognizing exclusion.” In this session, through conversation and a design jam, we’ll explore the notion of inclusive course design through the lens of noticing exclusion. Have you ever felt excluded by design? What exclusions are built (unintentionally or intentionally) into your course design? What are the actual impacts of your intended designs? Participants will come away with tools and strategies for noticing exclusion in course design, and ideas for steps to counteract those exclusions.

2022-07-01T16:55:09-04:00

Co-designing Learning

Thursday, August 25, 2022
11:00 am-noon Pacific / 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern

Online via Zoom

Co-design is a set of values and practices that can be used to put inclusive design into action. Co-design involves working with those for whom you are designing – in learning design, our students – throughout the design process. In this session, participants will learn about co-design as an approach to centering students’ lived experiences within the course design process, and use co-design strategies in a design jam.

2022-07-01T16:55:30-04:00

Using the Middlebury Online Course Design Rubric to Support Inclusive Learning Design

Friday, August 26, 2022
11:00 am-noon Pacific / 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern

Online via Zoom

DLINQ developed the Middlebury Online Course Design rubric to articulate the core components of good online course design – and many of these practices also apply to hybrid and in person courses as well. In this session, we’ll focus on aspects of the rubric that speak directly to inclusive design. After reviewing these aspects of the rubric, participants will spend the majority of the session using the rubric to review one of their own courses, with a focus on identifying areas for improvement, as well as strategies for next steps.